04 February 2020

Configuring LiClipse to run Anaconda or Miniconda

I'll have to admit, it is indeed better to use a virtual environment when dealing with Python. If you mess up your native Python, the system won't work properly. But the problem with using Python this way, is that there may be packages that aren't available for install via conda for particular versions of Python. That gets very annoying.
This article explains how to setup LiClipse to work with Anaconda or Miniconda. Specifically, Miniconda.

Open LiClipse. In the main menu, goto Window > Preferences.
Type "interpreters" in the search box.
Click "Python interpreter".
Click the "Browse for Python/pypy exe" button.
Close the first window that opens and you'll see this:


Browse to your Miniconda folder and select the python3 or python file in ~/miniconda3/bin.

In Interpreter Name, enter a name of your choice: MinicondaPython3.7, for example.

One more window opens up. Click Ok.

Now (assuming your Python project is open), in the main menu of LiClipse, select Run > Run Configurations.
In the left column, right click on Python Run. Select "New Configuration".

Under the "main" tab, choose your project name and specify the main file.
In the "interpreter" tab, select MinicondaPython3.7.

That's it. Install any necessary Python packages using the conda command, and you are ready to run your project!

02 January 2020

Clearing swap space in Ubuntu

When having two large applications open in Ubuntu can cause slow performance because of swapping memory from hard disk to RAM, it leaves one perplexed to see swap space still being used after all applications are closed.



I investigated this a bit more to find out that it's better not to mess around with the kernel's swappiness parameter, and that using the "top" program or other scripts is not really necessary. You don't even need to use vmstat to check the si and so columns to see if swaps-in and swaps-out are happening.

There's a far simpler option that promptly copies all swap memory back to RAM.

sudo swapoff -a; sudo swapon -a


I opened a large application by the time I took the screenshot, hence the greater usage


Enjoy!